White Collar

  • March 01, 2024

    Ga. Tech Prof Gets Most China-Tied Fraud Charges Tossed

    A Georgia federal judge on Friday overruled a federal magistrate in dismissing nine of 10 criminal charges against a former Georgia Institute of Technology professor who was accused of using his post to help bring foreign nationals into the U.S. to covertly work for Chinese telecommunications firm ZTE.

  • March 01, 2024

    2nd Circ. Won't Revive Ex-Barclays Exec's Whistleblower Suit

    The Second Circuit on Friday affirmed a lower court's decision to toss a whistleblower suit from a former Barclays executive, finding that he didn't sufficiently back up his allegations of retaliation under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act.

  • March 01, 2024

    DOJ Defends Broad Enron Law Reading In Capitol Riot Suit

    A federal law that makes it a crime to "corruptly" obstruct an official proceeding was intended as a "catchall offense" and can be used to prosecute participants in the Jan. 6, 2021, riot at the U.S. Capitol, the federal government told the U.S. Supreme Court.

  • March 01, 2024

    DC Circ. Revives BuzzFeed's Bid For HSBC Laundering Report

    The D.C. Circuit handed former BuzzFeed reporter Jason Leopold a win Friday, reviving his fight to unseal a 2015 report on money laundering at HSBC Bank and remanding the Justice Department's earlier district court summary judgment win in the case.

  • March 01, 2024

    Trump Challenges Origins Of Prosecution In Fla. Docs Case

    The special counsel's office prosecuting Donald Trump's criminal case on mishandling classified documents told the Florida federal judge overseeing the case on Friday that his attorneys don't have a viable claim challenging the origins of the prosecution team, arguing that intelligence agencies had no role in determining the charges against the former president.

  • March 01, 2024

    Justices' Trump Immunity Ruling Could Delay Trial Indefinitely

    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to review former President Donald Trump's claim that he's immune from prosecution for allegedly interfering in the 2020 presidential election could indefinitely delay a trial in the case, attorneys say, by raising additional questions that the courts must answer first.

  • March 01, 2024

    Pa. Supreme Court Snapshot: Judge's Side Gig Vexes Tax Row

    In its first argument session of 2024, the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania will once again have seven justices on the bench to hear cases concerning issues like a judge taking a second job, following last year's elevation of Superior Court Judge Daniel D. McCaffery to fill the vacancy left by the death of former Chief Justice Max Baer in 2022.

  • March 01, 2024

    Harvard Grad Conned Alums In $3M Scheme, NY AG Says

    A Harvard Business School graduate suspected of swindling nearly $3 million from his fellow alum — one of whom reportedly took his own life after losing $100,000 — has been ordered by a New York state court judge to stop soliciting investors in what investigators called a classic Ponzi scheme.

  • March 01, 2024

    Fintech Co. Vesttoo's Ch. 11 Plan OK'd After Dissent Defused

    A Delaware bankruptcy judge has approved the Chapter 11 liquidation plan proposed by the official committee of unsecured creditors to bankrupt Israeli fintech firm Vesttoo Ltd., after the committee sorted out a final objection to the plan.

  • March 01, 2024

    Judge Doubts Drowsy Juror, Mask Rules Warrant New VC Trial

    A California federal judge expressed doubts Friday over claims that self-described "millennial" venture capitalist Michael Rothenberg deserves a new trial because of a drowsy juror and the court's COVID-19 mask rules, saying he disagrees that the juror was asleep and "welcomes" the Ninth Circuit's guidance on courtroom-masking requirements.

  • March 01, 2024

    SC Man Cops To Threatening Federal Judge, Courthouse

    A South Carolina man has pled guilty to sending a letter threatening to kill a federal judge and warning that he might blow up a courthouse, the government said Friday.

  • March 01, 2024

    Account Manager Who Stole $3M From Employer Gets 2 Years

    A Manhattan federal judge sentenced an account manager from Long Island to two years in prison Friday, after she admitted embezzling $3 million from her former employer over seven years, including via the use of forged signatures.

  • March 01, 2024

    Off The Bench: NCAA Loses On NIL, DC Wins With Stadium

    In this week's Off The Bench, a judge unlocked the door to name, image and likeness money for college athletes, Shaquille O'Neal's Hollywood debut still rings true three decades later, and D.C. clears an early legislative hurdle in its bid to bring back its namesake NFL team. If you were on the sidelines over the past week, Law360 is here to clue you in on the biggest sports and betting stories that had our readers talking.

  • March 01, 2024

    A 'Loud Bang,' Then Chaos: 'Rust' Director Recalls Fatal Shot

    The director of "Rust" took the stand Friday during the involuntary manslaughter trial of film armorer Hannah Gutierrez-Reed, describing a chaotic scene inside a New Mexico church in the moments before and after the on-set shooting death of the film's cinematographer.

  • March 01, 2024

    Iranian National Faces 20 Years For Defense Hack Scheme

    An Iranian national faces up to 20 years in prison for his alleged role in a yearslong hacking scheme that targeted U.S. companies, including defense contractors, often by using fake female personas on social media, according to a freshly unsealed indictment.

  • March 01, 2024

    Ga. Judge Will Rule Within 2 Weeks On Bid To DQ Fulton DA

    The Fulton County, Georgia, judge overseeing the election interference case against former President Donald Trump said Friday that, after days of salacious testimony about District Attorney Fani T. Willis' alleged improper relationship, he wants to hear legal arguments about whether the prosecutor should be disqualified.

  • March 01, 2024

    McNees Wallace White Collar Duo Joins Eastman & Smith

    A pair of white collar defense attorneys who recently represented the Ohio Republican Party's former chair in a $60 million bribery case have jumped ship from McNees Wallace & Nurick LLC to join Eastman & Smith Ltd.'s office in Columbus, the firm announced Friday.

  • March 01, 2024

    DC Circ. Strikes Down Sentencing Add-On For Jan. 6 Rioter

    A former U.S. Air Force officer who participated in the storming of the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021, has had his two-year prison sentence vacated, the D.C. Circuit ruled Friday, finding in a precedential ruling that rioters involved should not face an "administration of justice" enhancement because the process they disrupted was legislative, not judicial.

  • March 01, 2024

    Menendez Associate Pleads Guilty In Bribe Case

    A New Jersey insurance broker pled guilty Friday to bribing Sen. Bob Menendez and his wife, Nadine, by buying her a Mercedes-Benz convertible, under an agreement to cooperate with federal prosecutors.

  • March 01, 2024

    Russian Admits To Smuggling US Tech With Military Uses

    A Russian national pled guilty in a New York federal court to money laundering and smuggling, after being accused by U.S. prosecutors of operating a network that brought sensitive U.S. microelectronics with military applications to Russia.

  • March 01, 2024

    Oil Trader Gunvor To Pay $665M For Ecuadorian Bribe Scheme

    Gunvor Group on Friday admitted to conspiring to bribe officials of the Ecuadorian government in order to win business for the energy commodities giant and agreed to pay $665 million as part of criminal resolutions with the U.S. Department of Justice and Swiss authorities.

  • February 29, 2024

    Trump Says 'Fair' Docs Case Trial Must Happen After Election

    Donald Trump on Thursday asked a Florida federal court not to schedule a trial in the criminal classified documents case against him until after this year's presidential election, arguing that a fair trial "cannot be conducted this year in a manner consistent with the Constitution."

  • February 29, 2024

    Veteran Journalist Held In Contempt For Not Divulging Source

    A D.C. federal judge on Thursday found veteran journalist Catherine Herridge in civil contempt of his order to reveal her sources for a series of stories she wrote while at Fox News about a Chinese American scientist who was the subject of a federal investigation.

  • February 29, 2024

    Pentagon Leak Suspect To Change Plea In Hearing Next Week

    Federal prosecutors indicated Thursday that a former Massachusetts Air National Guardsman will change his not guilty plea to charges he posted hundreds of top-secret military intelligence documents online, asking a Massachusetts federal judge to schedule a change of plea hearing for next week.

  • February 29, 2024

    DOJ Says Court Rehab Means Ga. Bid Rig Case Must Move

    Construction at Savannah, Georgia's federal courthouse means three men accused of conspiring to rig bids for millions of dollars' worth of ready-mix concrete contracts will have to be tried in a college town a couple of counties over, according to the DOJ.

Expert Analysis

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • How Echoing Techniques Can Derail Witnesses At Deposition

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    Before depositions, defense attorneys must prepare witnesses to recognize covert echoing techniques that may be used by opposing counsel to lower their defenses and elicit sensitive information — potentially leading to nuclear settlements and verdicts, say Bill Kanasky and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Opinion

    OFAC Should Loosen Restrictions On Arbitration Services

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    The Office of Foreign Assets Control regulations should be amended so that U.S. persons can provide arbitration services to sanctioned parties — this would help align OFAC policy with broader U.S. arbitration policy, promote efficiency, and effectively address related geopolitical and regulatory challenges, says Javier Coronado Diaz at Diaz Reus.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    Compassionate Release Grants Needed Now More Than Ever

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    After the U.S. Sentencing Commission's recent expansion of the criteria for determining compassionate release eligibility, courts should grant such motions more frequently in light of the inherently dangerous conditions presented by increasingly understaffed and overpopulated federal prisons, say Alan Ellis and Mark Allenbaugh at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • Communication Is Key As CFPB Updates Appeals Process

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    Though a recently updated Consumer Financial Protection Bureau rule expands financial institutions' abilities to appeal supervisory decisions, creating strong relationships and open communication channels with CFPB examiners may help resolve disputes faster than the more cumbersome formal process, says Jason McElroy at Saul Ewing.

  • Unpacking The New Russia Sanctions And Export Controls

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    Although geographically broad new prohibitions the U.S., U.K. and EU issued last week are somewhat underwhelming in their efforts to target third-country facilitators of Russia sanctions evasion, companies with exposure to noncompliant jurisdictions should pay close attention to their potential impacts, say attorneys at Shearman.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

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    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Justices' Double Jeopardy Ruling Preserves Acquittal Sanctity

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s unanimous decision last week in McElrath v. Georgia, barring the state from retrying a man acquitted of murder after a so-called repugnant verdict, is significant in the tangled web of double jeopardy jurisprudence for its brief and unequivocal protection of an acquittal’s finality, says Lissa Griffin at Pace Law School.

  • Steps For Companies New To Sanctions Compliance

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    Businesses newly required to implement compliance programs due to the increased breadth of mandatory sanctions and export controls, including 500 additional Russia sanctions announced last Friday, should closely follow the guidance issued by the Office of Foreign Assets Control and other regulators, say Jennifer Schubert and Megan Church at MoloLamken.

  • Bank Secrecy Act Lessons For Casinos After DOJ Settlements

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    The U.S. Department of Justice's recent settlements with the MGM Grand and Cosmopolitan casinos, resolving an investigation into alleged violations of the Bank Secrecy Act, signal a shift in the DOJ's enforcement focus and provide insight into potential pitfalls in anti-money laundering compliance programs, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • High Court Forfeiture Case Again Pits Text Against Purpose

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    In oral arguments Tuesday in McIntosh v. U.S., the U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether a federal court can impose asset forfeiture on a defendant even if it doesn’t comply with timing rules, which may affect the broader interpretation of procedural deadlines — and tees up the latest battle between textualism and purposivism, say Anden Chow and Christian Bale at MoloLamken.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Cos. Must Know How NY, Federal LLC Disclosure Laws Differ

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    Though New York state's new LLC Transparency Act and the federal Corporate Transparency Act impose similar beneficial owner reporting obligations on limited liability companies, New York LLCs should study the important differences between the laws to ensure they are prepared to comply with both, say Abram Ellis, Olenka Burghardt and Jane Jho at Simpson Thacher.

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