Daily Litigation

  • SDNY Taps Nonprofit To Run Clinic For Pro Se Litigants

    The City Bar Justice Center announced Tuesday that it has been enlisted to take over the Southern District of New York's 8-year-old legal assistance clinic's services for self-represented litigants, as many low-income Americans face the civil legal system alone.

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    5th Circ. Mulls Acts Vs. Belief In Anti-Abortion Worker's Firing

    The Fifth Circuit on Monday seemed torn over whether it should "split hairs" between religious conduct and religious belief as it weighed whether to uphold a Southwest flight attendant's win in a wrongful termination suit over graphic anti-abortion messages she sent her union president.

  • No Sanctions For 'Fraudulent' Signatures In 3M Earplug MDL

    A Florida federal judge has decided against sanctioning two law firms that signed documents in place of their clients but chastised their lawyers' "obviously improper" act, which could have cut their clients out of their share of the $6 billion settlement in the 3M combat earplugs multidistrict litigation.

  • Drug Cos. Can Depose DC AG In Drug Price-Fixing Row

    A Connecticut federal judge reluctantly ordered the District of Columbia Attorney General's Office to be deposed by the drug companies wrapped up in more than 40 states' claims over an alleged price-fixing conspiracy, noting that he would not have done so but for the case being remanded from a sprawling multidistrict litigation in Pennsylvania.

  • Title Insurer Says Ga. Firm Must Repay $158K For Deed Error

    A title insurance company said a Georgia law firm must reimburse it $158,000 for negligently issuing a title insurance policy on a real estate closing, telling a Georgia federal court that it is entitled to contractual and common law indemnity for its losses.

  • Equifax Judge OKs $1.1M Atty Fees In Debt Reporting Deal

    Attorneys will recover $1.1 million in fees for securing $500 payments for class members in litigation alleging Equifax reported unenforceable debts, a decision that comes several months after a California federal judge warned he would likely hold a portion of the fees until he learned the ultimate settlement payout.

  • Lawyer Sues Ex, Attys After $30K Law School Loan Judgment

    A Florida employment lawyer's onetime romantic partner and her attorneys conspired with a Wells Fargo consultant to concoct a phony and vexatious lawsuit against him amid a fight over his student loan payments and child visitation rights, according to a lawsuit filed in Connecticut federal court.

  • Bid To Disqualify Firm In Hawaii Warehouse Suit Denied

    A Hawaii federal magistrate judge has denied a bid to disqualify McCorriston Miller Mukai MacKinnon LLP from representing Schulte Building Systems in litigation accusing the manufacturer of producing shoddy steel components for certain agricultural warehouses in Oahu.

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    Standards Are Murky As Legal Employers Vet Protesters

    As violence in Gaza rages on, law firms have vowed not to employ lawyers whose activism for Palestinian rights they deem unacceptable. But "unacceptable" is in the eye of the beholder, and that makes it difficult for law students and lawyers who advocate for a ceasefire to navigate the workplace and the job market.

  • Tubi Accuses Keller Postman Of Filing Frivolous Arbitrations

    Streaming service company Tubi Inc. is going after a plaintiffs firm in Washington, D.C., federal court, alleging it has engaged in a mass arbitration scheme in which the firm has filed more than 23,000 allegedly frivolous or fraudulent demands for arbitration in attempts to force the company to settle.

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    Jury Trials Dwindle In State Courts; Fall Started Before COVID

    Jury trials have continued to "vanish" from state courts, despite seeing a slight bump following the pandemic shutdowns, with 2021 seeing fewer than half the number of jury trials as 2019 and one-third the number held in 2007, according to a new report from the National Center for State Courts.

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    Gibson Dunn Antitrust Pro Jumps To Paul Weiss

    An antitrust expert and former U.S. Department of Justice attorney has moved his practice to Paul Weiss Rifkind Wharton & Garrison LLP's Washington, D.C., office after a combined more than 10 years with Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP.

  • 3rd Circ. Backs Bad Subpoena Sanction In Race, Sex Bias Suit

    The Third Circuit has upheld a $6,720 fee sanction against a New Jersey attorney for serving an intentionally misleading subpoena while representing a Garden State management company against federal race and sex bias claims.

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    Law Firm Faces Sanctions Bid For Happy Meal 'Extortion' Suit

    McDonald's has urged a Florida federal court to sanction Fischer Redavid PLLC and its clients for bringing a recently dismissed lawsuit seeking a warning on Happy Meal containers, accusing them of trying to extort the company for a bigger payout after securing an $800,000 jury verdict in a related case for the second-degree burns suffered by a girl from a dangerously hot Chicken McNugget.

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    Skadden Adds Ex-SDNY Deputy US Attorney As Partner

    Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom LLP is adding a former top federal prosecutor who recently worked on cases against FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried and Archegos Capital Management founder Bill Hwang as a partner in New York, the firm announced Monday.

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    Cozen O'Connor Hires Sidley Securities Litigator In NY

    Cozen O'Connor has hired a longtime Sidley Austin LLP associate who joins the firm's New York City office to continue his practice focused on a range of securities matters, the firm announced Monday.

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    NYC Condo Board Blames Damages On Seyfarth Atty

    The board of managers for a condominium building in Manhattan wants more than $1 million in damages from its former Seyfarth Shaw LLP attorney, who the board argues hurt it in litigation with the owner of a building unit by presenting "frivolous" and "bad faith" arguments.

  • Attys Get $10M In Fees In Family Dollar Infestation Deal

    A Tennessee federal judge has granted $10 million in fees to attorneys representing consumers following a settlement to resolve multidistrict litigation stemming from a rodent infestation at a Family Dollar Stores Inc. warehouse, finding the fees reasonable for the work done on the case.

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    Brown Rudnick Enters Lone Star State With Boutique Founder

    Brown Rudnick LLP has launched its first Texas shop with a seasoned litigator in Houston who came aboard from Schiffer Hicks Johnson PLLC, a boutique firm he co-founded 17 years ago.

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    From Refugee To Shareholder: A Call For Inclusive Law Firms

    A Sandberg Phoenix & von Gontard PC shareholder recently shared her experiences advancing as a woman at a law firm, and why businesses must create an inclusive workplace culture.

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    Justice Gorsuch Calls Colleagues 'Best Writers' In History

    Justice Neil Gorsuch recently sat down for a keynote conversation during the 25th annual Burton Awards in Washington, D.C., where he reflected on his approach to writing opinions, his originalist method to interpreting the Constitution and the civility that exists between his fellow justices.

  • Orrick's $8M Deal To End Data Breach Claims Nears Prelim OK

    A California federal judge indicated Friday that she'll preliminarily approve Orrick Herrington & Sutcliffe LLP's $8 million deal to end putative class claims over a 2023 data breach that purportedly exposed personal information for 638,000 individuals, but said the "very broad" scope of the settlement's release "raised my eyebrows."

  • Lindell No-Shows Amid Solvency Concerns In Sanctions Fight

    Attorneys for My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell were nowhere to be found Friday as a D.C. federal judge mulled how much they should pay in sanctions for counterclaims in election company Dominion's ongoing libel suit, saying he'd likely set an amount in the coming weeks.

  • WDTX Chief Adds New Hurdle For Patent Attys Eyeing Albright

    The Western District of Texas' chief judge has made it harder for parties to have their patent cases end up in U.S. District Judge Alan Albright's court by refusing to automatically connect related litigation.

  • Greek IT Company Sues NY Law Firm Over Leaked Patent Info

    A Greece-based technology company has sued Ladas & Parry LLP in New York federal court, alleging that the firm sent proprietary information to a third party while the company had an attorney-client agreement with the firm.

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Expert Analysis

  • For Asian American Lawyers, Good Mentorship Is Crucial Author Photo

    Navigating the legal world as an Asian American lawyer comes with unique challenges — from cultural stereotypes to a perceived lack of leadership skills — but finding good mentors and treating mentorship as a two-way street can help junior lawyers overcome some of the hurdles and excel, say attorneys at Paul Weiss.

  • Coping With Secondary Trauma From Pro Bono Work Author Photo

    As the need for pro bono services continues to grow in tandem with the pandemic, attorneys should assess their mental well-being and look for symptoms of secondary traumatic stress, while law firms must carefully manage their public service programs and provide robust mental health services to employees, says William Silverman at Proskauer.

  • How Firms Can Benefit From Creating Their Own ALSPs Author Photo

    As more law firms develop their own legal services centers to serve as both a source of flexible personnel and technological innovation, they can further enhance the effectiveness by fostering a consistent and cohesive team and allowing for experimentation with new technologies from an established baseline, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • Modernizing Legal Education Through Hybrid JD Programs Author Photo

    Amid pandemic-era shifts in education, law schools and other stakeholders should consider the wide geographic and demographic reach of Juris Doctor programs with both online and in-person learning options, and educators should think through the various ways hybrid programs can be structured, says Stephen Burnett at All Campus.

  • How BigLaw Can Mirror Small Firm Attorney Engagement Author Photo

    BigLaw has the unique opportunity to hit refresh post-pandemic and enhance attorney satisfaction by adopting practices that smaller firms naturally employ — including work assignment policies that can provide junior attorneys steady professional development, says Michelle Genet Bernstein at Mark Migdal.

  • Ditch The Annual Review To Boost Attorney Job Satisfaction Author Photo

    In order to attract and retain the rising millennial generation's star talent, law firms should break free of the annual review system and train lawyers of all seniority levels to solicit and share frequent and informal feedback, says Betsy Miller at Cohen Milstein.

  • How Attorneys Can Narrow LGBTQ Gap In The Judiciary Author Photo

    Lawyers can take several steps to redress the lack of adequate LGBTQ representation on the bench and its devastating impact on litigants and counsel in the community, says Janice Grubin, co-chair of the Judiciary Committee at the LGBT Bar Association of Greater New York.

  • Employers Must Heed Rising Attorney Stress And Alcohol Use Author Photo

    Krill Strategies’ Patrick Krill, who co-authored a new study that revealed alarming levels of stress, hazardous drinking and associated gender disparities among practicing attorneys, highlights how legal employers can confront the underlying risk factors as both warnings and opportunities in the post-COVID-19 era.

  • Lawyers Can Get Ready For Space Law To Take Flight Author Photo

    While international agreements for space law have remained relatively unchanged since their creation decades ago, the rapid pace of change in U.S. laws and policies is creating opportunities for both new and veteran lawyers looking to break into this exciting realm, in either the private sector or government, says Michael Dodge at the University of North Dakota.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: What Makes A Successful Summer Associate? Author Photo

    Navigating a few densely packed weeks at a law firm can be daunting for summer associates, but those who are prepared to seize opportunities and not afraid to ask questions will be set up for success, says Julie Crisp at Latham.

  • How To Successfully Market Your Summer Associate Program Author Photo

    Law firms can attract the right summer associate candidates and help students see what makes a program unique by using carefully crafted messaging and choosing the best ambassadors to deliver it, says Tamara McClatchey, director of career services at the University of Chicago Law School.

  • Opinion

    Judges Deserve Congress' Commitment To Their Safety Author Photo

    Following the tragic attack on U.S. District Judge Esther Salas' family last summer and amid rising threats against the judiciary, legislation protecting federal judges' personal information and enhancing security measures at courthouses is urgently needed, says U.S. District Judge Roslynn Mauskopf, director of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can Recalcitrant Attys Use Social Media? Author Photo

    Social media can be intimidating for reluctant lawyers but it can also be richly rewarding, as long as attorneys remember that professional accounts will always reflect on their firms and colleagues, and follow some best practices to avoid embarrassment, says Sean Marotta at Hogan Lovells.

  • Keys To Digitizing Inefficient Contract Management Processes Author Photo

    Neville Eisenberg and Mark Grayson at BCLP explain how they sped up contract execution for one client by replacing email with a centralized, digital tool for negotiations and review, and how the principles they adhered to can be helpful for other law firms looking to improve poorly managed contract management processes.

  • Series

    Ask A Mentor: How Can Firms Coach Associates Remotely? Author Photo

    Practicing law through virtual platforms will likely persist even after the pandemic, so law firms and senior lawyers should consider refurbishing their associate mentoring programs to facilitate personal connections, professionalism and effective training in a remote environment, says Carol Goodman at Herrick Feinstein.

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