Employment

  • February 27, 2024

    UFC, Fighters In Mediation Ahead Of Wage Suppression Trial

    Ultimate Fighting Championship has entered private mediation with a group of fighters suing the promotion in Nevada federal court for suppressing their wages by up to $1.6 billion, adding a new wrinkle to the case just weeks ahead of trial.

  • February 27, 2024

    Cleary And Vladeck Raskin Must Face Cuomo's Subpoena Bid

    Former New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo can continue his effort to force Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton LLP and Vladeck Raskin & Clark PC to turn over information about the women whose sexual misconduct accusations forced him to resign, a New York federal judge has said.

  • February 27, 2024

    Biden's Labor Secretary Nom Clears Senate Committee Again

    Julie Su, President Joe Biden's long-running nominee for labor secretary who has been temporarily serving in the role for the past year, made it through a Senate committee Tuesday, though her fate in the full chamber is uncertain.

  • February 27, 2024

    Chevron Fired Female Manager But Let Men Slide, Suit Says

    Chevron fired a female manager for keeping quiet about workers changing COVID-19 test records to evade travel restrictions but let men who did the same thing keep their jobs, according to a complaint filed in Texas federal court.

  • February 27, 2024

    GOP Lawmakers Press PBGC On $127M Pension Overpay

    The federal agency that bails out failing pension plans gave inadequate answers to two Republican lawmakers' questions about the agency's accidental $127 million overpayment to a Teamsters plan during the coronavirus pandemic, the lawmakers said in a letter to the agency, demanding it send new responses and documents. 

  • February 27, 2024

    Hospital Denies Nurses OT For Work During Breaks, Suit Says

    A Michigan hospital has been refusing to pay a group of nurses and technicians overtime wages by automatically deducting pay for meal breaks they cannot take, according to a proposed collective action filed in federal court.

  • February 26, 2024

    Diddy Producer Says He Was Sexually Assaulted, Harassed

    A producer who worked on Diddy's latest album said Monday that he was sexually assaulted and harassed by the rapper and his friends while living and working with him, and also witnessed Diddy providing "laced alcoholic beverages" to minors and sex workers, according to a lawsuit filed in New York federal court.

  • February 26, 2024

    Sales Reps Score $1.6M In Fees After Beating RICO Case

    A federal judge in Los Angeles has ordered a biotech startup to pay more than $1.6 million in legal fees to two former employees, after the company failed to convince a jury that the pair broke racketeering laws when they worked for a rival that stole proprietary information when setting up shop.

  • February 26, 2024

    FDIC Faces Staffing Crunch Amid Rising Turnover, IG Warns

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. is struggling to hire enough new employees to keep up with retirements and departures, especially in its examinations department, according to a report from the independent agency's inspector general.

  • February 26, 2024

    Ex-Bank CFO Cops To $700K Theft And Life Insurance Scam

    An ex-Eastern International Bank chief financial officer has pled guilty to defrauding the bank out of more than $700,000 to pay his personal expenses, and he admitted to opening life insurance policies in the names of bank employees to benefit his wife, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • February 26, 2024

    Business, Not Bias, Led To Mostly Black Layoffs, Judge Finds

    A federal judge has ruled that legitimate business interests drove a Washington, D.C., social services agency's choices regarding layoffs in 2010, despite those decisions disproportionately affecting Black workers — deciding the sole claim remaining in a proposed class action that has seen back-and-forth battles for more than 12 years.

  • February 26, 2024

    Colo. Workers Say United Jumped Gun On OT Exemption

    Employees of a United Airlines subsidiary who cleaned aircraft in Colorado airports were denied time-and-a-half overtime pay when they voluntarily picked up colleagues' shifts, two workers have alleged in a proposed class action filed in Colorado federal court.

  • February 26, 2024

    UAW, Fiat Chrysler Escape Engineers' Bribery Scheme Suit

    The United Auto Workers, Fiat Chrysler and others are off the hook for state fraud and civil conspiracy claims brought by auto engineers in connection to a bribery scheme between union officials and the automaker, a Michigan federal judge ruled Monday, citing a recent Sixth Circuit decision finding related allegations untimely.

  • February 26, 2024

    Ex-Workers Fight X's Bid To Toss Sex Bias Suit

    Former X Corp. workers urged a California federal court to keep in play their lawsuit alleging that Elon Musk's takeover of the company formerly known as Twitter caused women to lose their jobs, saying they put forward enough detail to survive the company's motion to dismiss.

  • February 26, 2024

    3rd Circ. Backs Amtrak's Win In Fired Black Worker's Bias Suit

    The Third Circuit declined Monday to revive a Black former Amtrak inspector's racial discrimination suit claiming he was fired out of prejudice, ruling he didn't show bias informed the company's decision to sack him for taking hundreds of dollars in gifts from a contractor.

  • February 26, 2024

    Gartner, Hackett Settle Trade Secrets, Employee-Poaching Suit

    Consulting firm Gartner Inc. and its rival The Hackett Group Inc. have settled a trade secrets fight that saw each company accuse the other of unfair trade practices, according to a filing dismissing the case from Connecticut federal court.

  • February 26, 2024

    Journos Say Feds Can't Delay Contractor Demographic Data

    The Center for Investigative Reporting urged a California federal court not to allow the U.S. Department of Labor to withhold government contractor demographic reports, arguing that any further delays in disclosure would harm the public.

  • February 26, 2024

    6th Circ. Sanctions Prison Co. For Not Disclosing Asset Info

    A Sixth Circuit panel has held a Federal Bureau of Prisons contractor in contempt for its "woefully inadequate" efforts to turn over financial records to the National Labor Relations Board as ordered, in a dispute over two fired union supporters' back pay.

  • February 26, 2024

    Miffed NC Biz Court Mulls Sanctions After Missed Deadlines

    A North Carolina Business Court judge on Monday chided counsel on both sides of an employment dispute for missing important deadlines on the eve of a jury trial, causing him to postpone the trial indefinitely and contemplate dismissing the case entirely.

  • February 26, 2024

    Feds Say Fla. Atty Can't Undo COVID Relief Fraud Conviction

    A U.S. attorney's office has pushed back on a Florida lawyer's bid to vacate her conviction in Georgia federal court of conspiring to defraud a coronavirus pandemic relief program, saying the government doesn't have to prove she was "behind the keyboard" when the applications were submitted to be convicted of the charges.

  • February 26, 2024

    Insurance Co. Beats Claims Analysts' OT Exemption Suit

    A life insurance company prevailed against disability claim analysts alleging they were wrongfully denied overtime pay, as an Illinois federal judge tossed their suit because the workers are administrative employees exempt from overtime requirements.

  • February 26, 2024

    Teamsters Tell 7th Circ. Sysco Must Arbitrate Benefits Dispute

    A Sysco distribution center in Indianapolis must arbitrate its dispute with a Teamsters local over workers' entitlement to early retirement benefits, the union told the Seventh Circuit, arguing the applicable collective bargaining agreement includes a broad arbitration clause.

  • February 26, 2024

    Voters Fight DeSantis' Bid To End Prosecutor Suspension Suit

    Two voters are urging a Florida federal judge not to throw out their suit challenging Gov. Ron DeSantis' suspension of elected prosecutor Monique Worrell, saying the case brings "plausible claims" of "egregious and norm-breaking constitutional violations" by the governor.

  • February 26, 2024

    Mich. Judge Vacates Award For Fund's $40M Liability Claim

    An arbitrator must again review a dispute over a union pension fund's claim that a demolition company owed more than $40 million in withdrawal liability, a Michigan federal judge ruled, vacating the arbitration award because evidence didn't back conclusions about the number of labor contracts involved.

  • February 26, 2024

    Black Truck Drivers Can't Revive Race Bias Suit At 3rd Circ.

    Two Black truck drivers for a supermarket chain couldn't beat "voluminous evidence" that they were fired for threatening a co-worker who one called a "rat" or a "snitch," the Third Circuit ruled, refusing to revive their suit blaming race bias for their termination.

Expert Analysis

  • Considerations For Lawyer Witnesses After FTX Trial

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    Sam Bankman-Fried's recent trial testimony about his lawyers' involvement in FTX's business highlights the need for attorney-witnesses to understand privilege issues in order to avoid costly discovery disputes and, potentially, uncover critical evidence an adversary might seek to conceal, says Lawrence Bluestone at Genova Burns.

  • Changes To Note In New AAA Mass Arbitration Rules

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    The American Arbitration Association updated its mass arbitration rules earlier this month — clarifying issues that were previously being litigated in front of the AAA, and significantly streamlining the process of getting to a merits arbitration for claimants who have suffered similar wrongs and are bound by mandatory arbitration clauses, say attorneys at Labaton Keller.

  • 9 Tools To Manage PAGA Claims After Calif. High Court Ruling

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    In Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills, the California Supreme Court recently dealt a blow to employers by ruling that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, but defendants and courts can still use arbitration agreements, due process challenges and other methods when dealing with unmanageable claims, says Ryan Krueger at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Workplace Speech Policies Limit Legal And PR Risks

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    As workers increasingly speak out on controversies like the 2024 elections and the Israel-Hamas war, companies should implement practical workplace expression policies and plans to protect their brands and mitigate the risk of violating federal and state anti-discrimination and free speech laws, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • Staying Ahead Of The AI Policymaking Curve

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    With artificial intelligence poised to be the hottest legislative and regulatory topic in 2024, expect the AI policymaking toolbox to continue to expand and evolve as stakeholders in the U.S. and abroad develop, deploy, use and learn more about these technologies, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • The 7th Circ.'s Top 10 Civil Opinions Of 2023

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    Attorneys at Jenner & Block examine the most significant decisions issued by the Seventh Circuit in 2023, and explain how they may affect issues related to antitrust, constitutional law, federal jurisdiction and more.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Series

    In Focus At The EEOC: Preserving Legal System Access

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    The track records of and public commentary from U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission leaders — including two recently confirmed Democratic appointees — can provide insight into how the agency may approach access to justice priorities, as identified in its latest strategic enforcement plan, says Aniko Schwarcz at Cohen Milstein.

  • Mitigating Compliance And Litigation Risks Of Evolving Tech

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    Amid artificial intelligence and other technological advances, companies must prepare for the associated risks, including a growing suite of privacy regulations, enterprising class action theories and consumer protection challenges, and proliferating disclosure obligations, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Calif. High Court Ruling Outlines Limits On PAGA Actions

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    While the California Supreme Court’s ruling last week in Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills held that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, the opinion also details how claims can be narrowed, providing a road map for defendants facing complex actions, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • NY Pay Frequency Cases May Soon Be A Thing Of The Past

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    Two recent developments in New York state have unfurled to suggest that the high tide of frequency-of-pay lawsuits may soon recede, giving employers the upper hand when defending against threatened or pending claims, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

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