More Employment Coverage

  • March 01, 2024

    Ill. Atty Sued For Defamation Can Still Assert Privilege

    An Illinois appellate panel held Friday that an exception to attorney-client privilege for criminal or fraudulent conduct does not extend to alleged defamation by attorneys, reversing a trial court that applied it to a Chicago attorney and law firm facing a defamation suit from the former senior pastor of an Illinois megachurch.

  • March 01, 2024

    Ex-Raytheon Worker Asks Full 5th Circ. To Revive Firing Suit

    An ex-Raytheon engineer pressed the full Fifth Circuit to reconsider a panel decision blocking claims that he was fired for reporting concerns with a naval system, saying the panel wrongly expanded a national security court review bar to government contractors.

  • March 01, 2024

    NJ Firm Loses Early Bid To Toss Atty's Fee-Split Row

    A New Jersey state judge on Friday refused to toss an attorney's claims that she's entitled to a nearly $425,000 cut of a foreclosure case settlement from when she served as an of counsel for Katz & Dougherty LLC, ruling that the firm's dismissal motion targeting an alleged "made-up" contract was premature.  

  • March 01, 2024

    Whistleblowers Say Paxton's Bid To Duck Deposition 'Disloyal'

    Whistleblowers accusing Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton of firing them for reporting suspected wrongdoing urged the state Supreme Court to reject his office's attempt to "derail litigation unilaterally" and avoid deposition in their retaliation lawsuit.

  • March 01, 2024

    DC Appeals Court Affirms 2014 Firing Of Administrative Judge

    A Washington, D.C., appeals court upheld the termination of a D.C. Office of Administrative Hearings judge who was fired nearly a decade ago amid scrutiny for a range of ethics violations that included steering a $43,000 city contract to the husband of the agency's general counsel.

  • February 29, 2024

    Exxon Protected From Plant Fire Suits, Texas Court Rules

    Providing workers' compensation insurance to its subcontractors shielded ExxonMobil Corp. from personal injury lawsuits brought by workers hurt in a fire at one of its petrochemical plants, a Texas appellate court said Thursday, overriding a trial court ruling against the oil giant.

  • February 29, 2024

    Ousted Talent Agency CEO Sues Over 'Bogus' Firing

    Talent agency Verve's former CEO William Weinstein sued his fellow co-founders in California state court Thursday, alleging they fired him in bad faith for the "bogus" cause to cut him out of his equity shares and leaked his termination to the press in violation of the confidentiality provisions of their operating agreement.

  • February 29, 2024

    Ex-JetBlue Flight Attendant's Subpoena Battle Heads To NY

    A former flight attendant for JetBlue Airways Corp. and her husband have dropped a legal battle that they launched Feb. 9 in Connecticut to force the airline to turn over subpoenaed documents in an underlying toxic tort case, but the federal court fight is set to continue next door.

  • February 29, 2024

    Colo. Firm Says Atty Abandoned Work While Seeking New Job

    A Denver debt collection law firm has accused a former senior associate of performing little to no meaningful work during a brief one-year tenure at the outfit while also pursuing a partnership role at another firm.

  • February 29, 2024

    Munck Wilson Adds IP Lawyer From Wood Smith

    A former Wood Smith Henning & Berman LLP attorney has made the move to Munck Wilson Mandala LLP in Los Angeles, bringing with her a history of working on intellectual property litigation and other commercial matters.

  • February 29, 2024

    NJ Panel Says Ex-City Prosecutor Not Eligible For Pension

    A former municipal prosecutor was not a city employee but a professional service provider, a New Jersey appellate panel held Thursday, stripping him of seven years of pension participation and credits.

  • February 29, 2024

    Defense Contractor Says Ex-Exec Took Sensitive Data To Rival

    A defense contractor accused a former executive of taking confidential business information and export-controlled data on the body armor it supplies to the U.S. military and local and state law enforcement to a rival, a foreign-owned business.

  • February 29, 2024

    No Early Wins In South Dakota Derailment Injury Suit

    A South Dakota federal judge won't let either a conductor or Rapid City, Pierre & Eastern RR Inc. notch early wins in a suit against the railroad over a 2019 derailment, saying there are factual questions about whether the railroad knew or should have known about the conditions on the track before the accident.

  • February 28, 2024

    Judge Clears Fujian Jinhua On Feds' Trade Secrets Claims

    A California federal judge has found that the federal government failed to show semiconductor-maker Fujian Jinhua Integrated Circuit Co. Ltd. is guilty of various claims in a suit accusing it of economic espionage in a trade secrets case.

  • February 28, 2024

    Judge Says Ermi Counterclaims In Qui Tam Case Can Stand

    A Georgia federal judge has refused to free Ermi LLC's former chief compliance officer from counterclaims the company lodged in response to her whistleblower suit accusing the company of fraud and retaliation, with the judge saying the company has adequately alleged breaches of fiduciary duty and contract claims.

  • February 27, 2024

    Conn. Restaurant Rejects Revamped Wine-Tasting Death Suit

    Citing the statute of limitations and an alleged failure to plead a valid case, a venerable New Haven restaurant has asked a Connecticut state judge to reject an amended lawsuit accusing it of recklessly overserving alcohol at a "mandatory" employee wine tasting event and allegedly causing a worker's drunk driving death.

  • February 27, 2024

    Goldman's $4.6M Exec Compensation Deal OK'd By Chancery

    A Delaware Chancery Court judge on Tuesday approved a settlement deal in a derivative suit against Goldman Sachs Group alleging excessive compensation was paid to nonemployee directors, which includes an agreement by the company to change its compensation practices and reduce executives' pay by an estimated $4.6 million.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ex-NESN Exec Gets 3½ Years In Fraud Scheme

    A former executive at the Massachusetts cable network that broadcasts Red Sox and Bruins games was sentenced Tuesday to 3½ years in prison for embezzling nearly $600,000 from his employer through an elaborate invoicing scheme, crimes a judge called both "deliberate" and "insidious" and the government called "brazen."

  • February 27, 2024

    11th Circ. Won't Revive Serbian IT Worker's Bias Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday backed a manufacturing company's defeat of a former information technology employee's suit alleging he was fired because he's Serbian, finding he was let go for improperly accessing another worker's computer, not because of his nationality.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ga. ICE Facility Dismissed From Forced Labor Suit

    A Georgia federal judge on Tuesday allowed an immigration detention facility to escape a proposed class action accusing it of forcing detainees to work for as little as $1 per day after it argued it couldn't be sued under Georgia law.

  • February 27, 2024

    Ascension Unit Will Pay $2.6M To End Time Clock BIPA Suit

    Presence Health Network in Illinois is set to pay $2.6 million to settle biometric privacy claims from a group of employees who claimed the health system violated their privacy rights by requiring them to scan their fingerprints for timekeeping without first obtaining consent, after a Chicago state judge signed off on the settlement.

  • February 26, 2024

    Sales Reps Score $1.6M In Fees After Beating RICO Case

    A federal judge in Los Angeles has ordered a biotech startup to pay more than $1.6 million in legal fees to two former employees, after the company failed to convince a jury that the pair broke racketeering laws when they worked for a rival that stole proprietary information when setting up shop.

  • February 26, 2024

    FDIC Faces Staffing Crunch Amid Rising Turnover, IG Warns

    The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. is struggling to hire enough new employees to keep up with retirements and departures, especially in its examinations department, according to a report from the independent agency's inspector general.

  • February 26, 2024

    Ex-Bank CFO Cops To $700K Theft And Life Insurance Scam

    An ex-Eastern International Bank chief financial officer has pled guilty to defrauding the bank out of more than $700,000 to pay his personal expenses, and he admitted to opening life insurance policies in the names of bank employees to benefit his wife, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • February 26, 2024

    Real Estate Co. Resolves Employee, Tenant Data Breach Suit

    Property manager and redeveloper Centerspace LP has settled a putative class action accusing the company of violating state law by waiting nearly eight months to notify the more than 8,000 victims of a November 2021 data breach.

Expert Analysis

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • How Echoing Techniques Can Derail Witnesses At Deposition

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    Before depositions, defense attorneys must prepare witnesses to recognize covert echoing techniques that may be used by opposing counsel to lower their defenses and elicit sensitive information — potentially leading to nuclear settlements and verdicts, say Bill Kanasky and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Args In APA Case Amplify Justices' Focus On Agency Power

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    In arguments last week in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve, the U.S. Supreme Court justices paid particular importance to the possible ripple effects of their decision, which will address when a facial challenge to long-standing federal rules under the Administrative Procedure Act first accrues and could thus unleash a flood of new lawsuits, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

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    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Future Not Looking Bright For Calif. Employee Nonsolicits

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    California's new legislation imposing potentially harsh consequences on employers for attempting to enforce noncompetes raises questions about the fate of employee nonsolicitation agreements — and both federal and state court decisions suggest the days of the latter may be numbered, say Anthony Oncidi and Philippe Lebel at Proskauer.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Del. Ruling Stands Out In Thorny Noncompete Landscape

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    In Cantor Fitzgerald v. Ainslie, the Delaware Supreme Court last month upheld the enforceability of forfeiture-for-competition provisions in limited partnership agreements, providing a noteworthy opinion amid a time of increasing disfavor toward noncompetes and following a string of Chancery Court rulings deeming them unreasonable, say Margaret Butler and Steven Goldberg at BakerHostetler.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Reassessing Trade Secrets Amid Proposed Noncompete Ban

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    The Federal Trade Commission's proposed ban on noncompete agreements as well as state bans make it prudent for businesses to reevaluate and reinvigorate approaches to trade secret protection, including knowing what information employees are providing to vendors, and making sure confidentiality agreements are put in place before information is shared, says Rob Jensen at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

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    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

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    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.