Colorado

  • March 01, 2024

    Gatos Silver Investors Get Initial OK On $21M Settlement

    A district judge granted preliminary approval to a $21 million settlement between a class of investors and precious metals producer Gatos Silver Inc. over allegations the company's Mexican operation fell short of expectations.

  • March 01, 2024

    Blockbuster Drug Sales Help Keep J&J Patent Alive

    Johnson & Johnson has persuaded a federal judge in Wilmington, Delaware, to rule in its favor in a patent case seeking to prevent a startup from launching a competing line of schizophrenia drugs, in part because Invega Sustenna has made the pharmaceutical giant billions of dollars.

  • March 01, 2024

    Cannabis Consulting Co. Says Clinic Owes $101K On Contract

    A laboratory and consulting firm that focuses on the cannabis industry alleged that a Michigan clinic owes the firm more than $100,000 for unpaid services, according to a lawsuit filed in Colorado federal court.

  • March 01, 2024

    Colo. Judge Says Atty Depo Is Just 'Nature Of The Beast'

    The lawyer who helped a startup founder negotiate an acquisition deal with another company must sit for a deposition in the founder's suit alleging he was taken advantage of, a Colorado federal judge ruled, saying it was the "nature of the beast" for deals lawyers to sometimes get pulled into litigation.

  • March 01, 2024

    Energy Dept. Halts Crypto Mining Survey To End Industry Suit

    The crypto industry group challenging a U.S. Department of Energy survey on crypto mining has reached an agreement that will see the government offices destroy any data they've already collected and circulate the survey for comment from stakeholders — a step the crypto players say the government improperly bypassed the first time around.

  • March 01, 2024

    Tort Report: $42M Med Mal Award; Hot Coffee Suit In The Air

    A suit over hot coffee spilled at 40,000 feet and the affirmation of a $42 million medical malpractice verdict in Illinois lead Law360's Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • March 01, 2024

    Gov't Wants Spectrum Fraud Case Against Dish Dismissed

    The Justice Department has decided to intervene in a suit accusing Dish Network of using sham companies to buy spectrum from the Federal Communications Commission at a $3.3 billion discount, but not to take over litigation of the matter — it wants to end the whole thing.

  • March 01, 2024

    FTC Backs Colo. Right-To-Repair Expansion

    A Federal Trade Commission representative appeared at a Colorado legislative hearing in support of a proposed "right-to-repair" law requiring manufacturers to provide documentation, software, data and certain tools to allow consumers to fix their own digital electronic equipment.

  • March 01, 2024

    Colo. Real Estate Brokerage Settles Data Breach Class Claims

    A proposed class settled a data breach lawsuit against a Denver-based real estate brokerage and property management company in Colorado federal court.

  • March 01, 2024

    Trucking Co. Seeks Early Win In Colo. Drivers' OT Suit

    A trucking company has asked a Colorado federal judge to grant it a win in a group of drivers' lawsuit alleging unpaid overtime, arguing that the workers can't prove the statute of limitations should be extended to cover their claims.

  • February 29, 2024

    Veil Shouldn't Be Pierced To Decode Contracts, Panel Says

    The doctrine of piercing the corporate veil shouldn't be used to interpret disputed contract terms, a split Colorado appellate panel ruled Thursday, reversing a trial court's award of more than $600,000 in a real estate fight between two longtime friends.

  • February 29, 2024

    Colo. Panel Revives Wound Center's Damages Suit

    A Colorado state appellate panel Thursday revived a wound center's lawsuit against a rural healthcare district for payments related to its agreement with the district, finding in a published opinion that there were factual disputes a trial court failed to address in dismissing the wound center's breach of contract claims.

  • February 29, 2024

    Iowa State Athletes Cry Foul On State's Betting Dragnet

    Current and former Iowa State University athletes are looking to unwind the charges against them in the state's sports betting dragnet, asserting that investigators compiled evidence against them through illegal search and seizure.

  • February 29, 2024

    Colo. Panel Says Well Owners' Appeal Belongs In Water Court

    Two Colorado well owners can't bring a county district court lawsuit challenging a well permitting decision by the state water engineer because those issues are "water matters" that belong in a special water court, an appellate panel ruled Thursday.

  • February 29, 2024

    Colo. Firm Says Atty Abandoned Work While Seeking New Job

    A Denver debt collection law firm has accused a former senior associate of performing little to no meaningful work during a brief one-year tenure at the outfit while also pursuing a partnership role at another firm.

  • February 29, 2024

    10th Circ. Says NLRB's Remedies 'Inconsistent' With Law

    The National Labor Relations Board surpassed its powers when ordering a concrete company to make pension contributions and profit-sharing payments to workers without factoring in past compensation, the Tenth Circuit ruled, sending the case back to the board for a second look but finding the company violated federal labor law.

  • February 29, 2024

    Colo. House OKs Multistate Online Insurance Tax Filing

    Colorado would require insurance companies to pay certain taxes through a multistate third-party online application approved by the state Division of Insurance under legislation passed by the state House of Representatives.

  • February 28, 2024

    Judge Asks When Feds Will Consider Climate In Oil Leases

    A D.C. federal judge on Wednesday voiced frustration at the Bureau of Land Management's inability to account for the total impact of carbon emissions from six western oil and gas leases, but cautioned that previous circuit courts have upheld federal agencies' reluctance to block projects based on climate change predictions.

  • February 28, 2024

    Drilling Services Co. Must Face Suit Over Worker's Injury

    A company that provides power to oil drilling operations must face an indemnification lawsuit after a worker was electrocuted while fixing a downed line, according to a Colorado federal judge's order finding that the case wouldn't interfere with the worker's injury suit.

  • February 28, 2024

    Green Groups Pan Colorado's Monitoring Deal With Suncor

    A group of environmental advocacy organizations told a Colorado state judge that state environmental regulators and Suncor Energy gave them too little time to review a settlement about enforcement of air quality monitoring regulations, but said they saw enough to spot some concerning flaws.

  • February 28, 2024

    Suit Blames Father-Son Mismanagement For Pot Co. Collapse

    A member of a Colorado cannabis cultivation and dispensary business is asking a state district court to appoint a receiver over the company, saying a father and son involved have mismanaged the company by buying unlicensed cannabis plants and failing to prepare a processing facility.

  • February 28, 2024

    Utah, Okla.'s EPA Ozone Challenge Sent To DC Circ.

    The Tenth Circuit slingshotted seven consolidated challenges to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's decision disapproving Utah and Oklahoma's air quality plans to the D.C. Circuit, finding the Clean Air Act requires the disputes to fall under D.C. Circuit jurisdiction given the decision's national scope.

  • February 28, 2024

    Oil Co. Says It's Too Broke For Colo. Regulators' $130M Bond

    An oil and gas production company is asking a Colorado state judge to stay regulators' "exorbitant" order requiring it to pay $130 million in financial assurance on its obligation to plug and remediate oil and gas wells, arguing the company doesn't even have the cash for a $13 million installment due this month.

  • February 27, 2024

    $11M Meat Co. Deals Get Early OK In Colo. Wage Fixing Suit

    A Colorado federal judge Tuesday gave initial approval to class settlements with two meat producers and a consulting company, requiring $11.25 million in payments to resolve claims that they participated in a nationwide scheme to fix and depress wages for meat plant workers.

  • February 27, 2024

    Colo. Wants Immediate End To Sick Leave Law Challenge

    The state of Colorado called on a federal court to immediately dismiss an airline lobbying group's challenge to a state sick leave law, arguing that recent precedent established that the law was not preempted by the Airline Deregulation Act.

Expert Analysis

  • 10th Circ. Ruling Means More Okla. Oilfield Pollution Litigation

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    By applying Oklahoma's statutory definitions of pollution to a private landowner's claim for negligence for the first time, the Tenth Circuit's recent decision in Lazy S Ranch v. Valero will likely make it harder to obtain summary judgment in oilfield contamination cases, and will lead to more litigation, say attorneys at GableGotwals.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • Regulatory Trends Offer 4 Lessons For Debt Relief Providers

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    A string of enforcement actions, including a New York lawsuit filed last month by seven states and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, underscore the regulatory scrutiny that debt relief and credit repair companies face and offer important lessons on telemarketing and deceptive practices compliance, say attorneys at Sheppard Mullin.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • 5 Lessons For SaaS Companies After Blackbaud Data Breach

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    Looking at the enforcement actions that software-as-a-service provider Blackbaud resolved with state attorneys general, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and the Federal Trade Commission in the past year can help SaaS companies manage these increasingly common forms of data breaches, say attorneys at Orrick.

  • A Look Ahead For The Electric Vehicle Charging Industry

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    This will likely be an eventful year for the electric vehicle market as government efforts to accelerate their adoption inevitably clash with backlash from supporters of the petroleum industry, say Rue Phillips at SkillFusion and Enid Joffe at Green Paradigm Consulting.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Assessing The Future Of Colorado's Economic Loss Rule

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    The Colorado Supreme Court's decision to review a state appellate court's ruling in Mid-Century Insurance Co. v. HIVE Construction will significantly influence the future of Colorado's economic loss rule, with high stakes for the cost of doing business in the state, says David Holman at Crisham & Holman.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Reducing Carbon Footprint Requires A Tricky Path For CRE

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    As real estate owners find themselves caught between rapidly evolving environmental, social and governance initiatives and complicated societal debate, they will need to carefully establish formal plans to remain both competitive and compliant, say Michael Kuhn and Mahira Khan at Jackson Walker.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

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